Dental Bridge Q & A

1. What is a dental bridge?

A dental bridge is made to replace one or more missing teeth.  A dental bridge, as the name suggests, bridges the gap created by missing teeth.  The false teeth that bridge the gap, called pontics, can be made from gold, alloys, porcelain or a combination of these materials.  The bridge can be supported by natural teeth, implants, or a combination of natural teeth and implants.

2. Why should I get a bridge?

3. What types of bridges are available?

There are three types of dental bridges: traditional, cantilever, and Maryland bonded bridges.

  • A traditional bridge is normally created by placing crowns on the teeth on either side of the gap, and a false tooth is attached to the crowns to fill the empty space.
  • A cantilever bridge is like a traditional bridge, but only a crown on one side of the gap is used to hold the false tooth in place.
  • A Maryland bonded bridge is made up of false teeth attached to a metal framework with “wings” on each side that are bonded to the back of your existing teeth.

4.  How long does a bridge last?

 The longevity of a bridge varies from patent to patient, depending on oral hygiene practices.  The average is 11 years.  Some bridges can last a lifetime if cared for properly, but cavities on the adjacent teeth can damage the bridge, so brushing and flossing your bridge and surrounding areas is extremely important.  Regular visits to the dentist can also help ensure your bridge lasts as long as possible.

5. How much will it cost?

Dental bridges can be expensive, but at Masters’ Dental we do bridges for less!  Our permanent bridges start at $1,975.  We care for your teeth and your budget, so come see us today!

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