Mapping your Mouth

Have you ever wondered what is really going on inside your mouth? Well now it is time to find out. On your dental visits, you may hear your dentist call your teeth by specific names such as molars or incisors. Today, we are here to tell you what’s what in your mouth so you understand what your dentist is talking about.

If you take a look at the diagram below from Phoenix Children’s Hospital,  you can see where all of the different teeth are located in your mouth and around what age the teeth come in.  For more information on what each tooth is about see more information below.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

First, you have your central or lateral incisors. There are four incisors on each jaw, or in other words four on the top and four on the bottom. These teeth generally come in first and appear at the front of your mouth. Incisors are especially fitted for cutting your food as it enters your mouth.

Right after the incisors, you have your canine teeth. Canine teeth are also called cuspids, and these are the fang like teeth that are sharp and pointed. The purpose of these teeth is to help hold on to and tear food apart. One fun fact is that these teeth are often one of the largest teeth.

Finally, we have your molars. These are the teeth located at the back of your mouth used for grinding food. These teeth normally take the longest to come in and mature.

Keep in mind, this diagram is not always the same for everyone. We are all unique and different. Some people may have more of less teeth than others. However, generally this is what most of our mouths look like!

Flossing

How to Form Healthy Habits

We understand that good oral health is not always easy. It takes time and effort, and it might seem annoying at times to remember to floss everyday or get out of bed when your forget to brush your teeth. However, forming strong oral health habits is not as hard as it sounds, and it is critical to your health.

We have all dismissed the sweet hygienist or dutiful dentist who reminded us to try to floss more and not to skip a brushing at least once. We think it will take too much time to add flossing to our daily routine or that is is just not worth it, but both of those are misconceptions. It will not take that much time, and creating healthy habits such as this will have a great impact on your teeth, your health, and your life.

To help you start forming healthy oral health habits, we have done some research on how to build and create habits. Hopefully, these ideas will not only help you take care of your teeth, but also they may be useful in other areas of your life.

We have all heard it only takes 21 days to form or destroy a habit, but it actually takes much longer than that, so be patient! Studies have shown that it actually takes at least 66 days to make a habit stick. The art of creating a habit is creating an effective system that works for you.

First, you need a “cue” that reminds you to brush your teeth of floss. For me, this can be leaving my floss on the counter or a note reminding me to floss on my mirror. The second step is actually taking the time to complete the task. In this case, listen to your dentist. Brush. Floss. Gargle. Finally, make sure your reward yourself whether this be silent praise or some special time reading a book before bed. In this case, try to avoid food! But, make sure to be proud that you remembered!

It sounds easy, and it is. We are creatures of habit. The more we do this, the easier it becomes. If you miss a day though, don’t throw in the towel. Winners never quit, and neither should you. Just do the best you can for as long as you can, and you will be on your way to a beautiful healthy smile.